Dog, firecracker, panic and home alone.

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Some years ago, the movie “Home Alone” hit the theaters, a lone boy did have panic events, bad-guys and adapted to the situation.

Tonight, such Hollywood adventures and good endings are not possible.  A date night with a stage play and dogs (Count them, TWO) are left home to defend the house and home.

Honey, the honey (or sand-tan) colored dog, is large, powerful and quite laid back. Sudden noises can get her to flinch, knocks on doors get her to bark. Thunder, firecrackers, fireworks, meh, not so much.  The sudden large roll of thunder might get her to raise her head, but that is about all you get out of her.

The chocolate lab, on the other hand. Not so laid back.  She hates the electronic bug zapper, firecrackers in the distance are just wrong.

Thunder? No. Just no.

Tonight, we head out to see a stage play of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”, take in a dinner and sit through the long (two intermissions!) production with a total of four actors.

A pleasant Saturday night comes to a close, on our arrival home, we find one of the french doors to the great-room all but destroyed. The door jam is pulled away from the wall, the molding around the doorway has been chewed down and torn.  Wood.  Torn.

Torn?  Big danged splinters torn off, I could fit four fingers in the gap.

Paint is torn away from the wood as if a rough file had been run over it. Not fresh paint, either!  This took some work.

What the heck? Who did this?

Looking at the big dog first, she was first suspect, by all the family, until I pointed out that the kind of damage on the door took time. A lot of time.

And fear.  Something lit off a dog.

“Perhaps a knock at the door?”

No, not enough, they would bark and reset after a minute or two, this took time.

So now, the suspect is the smaller chocolate lab, who has a panic issue. We are coming to the 4th of July and explosives — which are not legal in the area — are a nightly event.

I think a deep panic set in, the cats aren’t talking, but they point little furry fingers at the dark brown one and whisper: “that bitch is crazy.”

*sigh*

Tomorrow, the door is on the list for repaires.  I may have to take it down and begin to prepare it for paint.

No fun to come home to that kind of damage.  But she stresses beyond reason when the pops are close- full fledged beyond sanity panic.

Some (four-legged) kids you can’t leave home without drugging them. I hate thinking that, or alternately, she cannot be left alone. She needs a human to stay with.

Over the 4th of July, we are taking off to a remote area that is 1. dog friendly and 2. having stayed before, they do not do fireworks, only down at the beach. We stay far away from the beach, hiding in an air-conditioned hotel room with thick walls, after we run her to the point of exhaustion on the beach and in the surf.

That is the plan of action, we will still suffer the tail end of the fireworks for another month to come.  But the worst of it will be avoided.

How was your night?

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Married by Accident Chapter 27. Kaikane

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Chapter 27. Kaikane

Less than a half-hour passed when the black limousine rolled around the corner.

Barbara could see the driver’s seat, the broad shoulders of Kaikane, the smile matched his build when he saw it was Barbara. A driver with enthusiasm for his clients.

Putting on his hat, as he got out, Kaikane looked professional and as pressed as if he came out of a dressing room.

‟Missus Barbara. Howzit? How’s Tom’s arm?” Kaikane had such a happy soul, that Barbara had to smile.

‟Oh, Kaikane, Tom is healing fast. The glass cut down through the bone, the doctors put on some hardware attached to his arm to help the bone heal.” Barbara looked down while she stepped up to the limousine while Kaikane held the door open.

Barbara put her hand out on the open door.

‟Kaikane, I want to ride up front with you.”

‟Missus Barbara, that’s not regular. All clients ride in the back.”

‟Kaikane, how long is the ride to the hospital?” She gave her best direct look at the Islander chauffeur. The effort nearly made her laugh. Kaikane was as friendly as Lettie and closer to her age.

‟Missus Barbara, it is all on the traffic, we will get there when we arrive, is all I can say.” In a philosophy that echoed his Hawai’ian spirit.

‟That’s alright, I would like to take the long way, if we can.” Barbara said.

“I would like to roll down the window and sit in front. Can we go around to west of the Golden Gate?” She asked.

‟’E’e,” His word sounded like he said ‟Aye” in his language. ‟For sure. T’wood ‘A‘ole pilikia Missus Barbara.”

Then he laughed softly as she got in the passenger seat without taking her eyes from him.

‟What does that mean?” The words bounced around in her brain and could not find a place to fit.

‟No problem.” Kaikane said as he closed the door.

Watching him as he walked around and then got into the driver’s seat. The limousine was not a large stretch, but it was roomy in the back. The front- not so much. It was cozy in her opinion. Just a standard seat. Somehow she had thought it might be more plush.

‟Kaikane, can I tell you something?”

‟’E’e. Of course Missus Barbara.”

‟First. Just call me Barbara, even Barb would work.”

‟I’m not sure I can do that, but I will try.” Kaikane was polite to a fault. A credit to Lettie’s training and his cultural heritage.

‟Fair enough.” Barbara smiled and then explained her entire month to the Hawaiian driver who made her feel comfortable with his smile and kind voice.

She found that he was a psych major at University of San Francisco, which was perfect for the dark-haired, smiling student.

‟Well, Missus…”She shot him a sideways look. ‟Ugh. Sorry, Barbara. My Kapuna Wahane said that the matters of the heart are the strength of a woman. Men of a certain age are best for fishing and building and making happy times.”

Kaikane laughed and Barbara swore he blushed.

They talked as he did a slow drive. He was six-months younger than she was, but he showed a wisdom that made her want to visit the islands of Hawaii.

Somewhere in his pidgin-surfer English and his wit, mixed with his grandmother- his Kapuna Wahane- Barbara knew that there was a path she could take in her life.

She just had to go home to Glenn and answer the question that her childhood sweetheart was going to ask.

Kaikane wheeled the limo around the point where the Golden Gate bridge’s foundation anchored it to the southern side. Connecting the orange-colored suspension bridge to the Marin Headlands where people lived and looked at San Francisco’s skyline out the windows of their homes.

“Kaikane, how long have you been on the mainland?” Barbara asked while looking out the window. “How does this area compare to your side of paradise?”

Kaikane laughed quietly as he paused at a stop-sign to let another car take its turn.

“I’ve been here for three years. A ways down the coast there is a place called Mavricks beach, has good surfing most of the time, but a few times of the year is world-class! I have competed all three years.”

“WOW! Have you won?”

“No.” Kaikane shrugged with a smile. “I can’t compete with some of the talent there. I have found I am afraid of Mavericks.”

“A surfer afraid to surf?” Barbara looked at him. “How does that work?”

“Some waves are higher than eight-story buildings, there have been two world-class pros that have died there.” Kaikane stopped smiling for the first time. “I can feel their mana that stays there. They have not gone on, they surf the waters there still.”

Barbara felt the need to paint. The things Kaikane kept talking about, mana, soul, spirit, breath was inspirational to her. For the first time, she knew that the Hawai’an was deeply spiritual.

In that moment, Barbara found that she had left mana in two places. Back home, where Glenn was and with Tom, where he lay in the hospital.

“Okay, Kaikane.” She said, coming out of her reverie of looking at the largest body of water in the world pass by as they drove south on Highway-1. “Take me back to the medical center. I’m ready to go back into that house of crazy people wearing white coats.”

“Yes Ma’am.” Kaikane smiled. “Sorry, Barbara.”

Turning left, Barbara saw the San Francisco zoo as they drove past.

“I will take Tom there when he gets discharged from the hospital.” She told Kaikane. “I have never been there, and I would bet it would be Tom’s first time as well.”

“That would be a good day. It is a large area, be prepared to spend a whole day there.” Kaikane said.

“Thank you for that warning. Note to self: comfortable shoes.”

She thought it might be fun to spend time with Tom at the zoo with a picnic of cheese and wine before she went back to her more mundane life.

After the hospital discharged him, she reminded herself, laughing.