Steel Gardens of Anid-Sta Generation 3. Chapter 4. Awakenings

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Gen 3. Chapter 4. Awakenings

“Ugh.” His mouth felt like someone stuck an old, used gym-sock in it. Then the pain hit. He tried to squeak again, but his tonsils complained loudly. His voice squeaked like fingernails on a chalkboard. His throat was on fire.

“Amsi. Shhh.” It was a familiar voice. “You will need some hydration, here is some warm water with honey and lemon.”

The first swallow was painful, but heaven followed close behind the swallow. The honey settled on the surface of his throat and put out the fire, the citrus hit, but the pain produced was, while not pleasant, tolerable and worked in concert with the honey for relief.

“Thank you…” Damn! He forgot her name. She was one of his crew, but not one of the engineers.

“Fae.” This was a different voice. Smaller, but with authority and nearby. “Her name is Fae.”

Amsi’s eyes took longer to focus than he thought it should.

“Slowly.” Doctor Ofir’s voice still sounded strange in his ears. “You have been sedated for two days after taken out of stasis. You have spent the last thirty-millenia at just under three-degrees Kelvin.”

“Thirty? We were only supposed to sleep for ten years. What happened?” He blinked again, sipping on the tea of honey and lemon. His eyes focusing more. “What the f..”

He paused.

“No offense but … what are you?”

“We are mini’s. Minibots. You set out to avoid the virus’ that the other system created in the ancient times, created nanobots to recycle all the machines of war. They are still around, but from them, the Core Systems evolved many more sizes.”

“Amsi, I will explain later.”

“I’m still wrapping my head around this… Robot? And how it evolved so quickly.”

“They call themselves “Bots”. They are an evolution that has happened over thousands of years, so not as swift as you think.”

“Wait.” Amsi shook his head, information was not processing. “What?”

“You need some more tea, maybe a shot of rum or vodka. I have a lot to bring you up to speed on.”

For the next two hours Fae spoke of three-hundred centuries, Core System, Thea, the Doctor, the tens of thousands of flitting artificial life forms outside the window that existed with great alloys of the machines of war that the people left sitting out when all, what the Core System logs called “Organics” went into cryogenic vitrification.

Reanimation, the Fae showed Amsi the logs, was a complicated, careful and exacting process using the nanobots and microbots and replacing the cryoprotectants that did not crystallize in ultra-low temperatures.

Even with helium as a superfluid, the crystals of ice did not form and poke holes in the cell walls of the body.

Such was the theory.

Initial numbers used, predictions estimated that one or two may not survive the freezing. (Mathematically, there would be a loss of 1.48 of the personnel.) Estimations were only for a single decade, after three-thousand times longer than anticipated, logs indicated forty-two pods showed excess cryoprotectant in the helium.

The bodies were leaking.

Nanobots, unable to function at such low temperatures were on standby.

However, after a long time, the Core Systems estimated that greater than half the fluids of the organic bodies had leached out. Rendering the humans inside little more than extremely cold, desiccated mummies.

Amsi moaned on the information she passed onto him.

“We were never meant for that length of storage. The system was never designed for that long of operation without supervision.”

“We supervised.” Thea fluttered about. “All systems were under the control of the Core System. Repairs performed by all the bots.”

“There were no qualified humans to oversee the machines.” Amsi the engineer argued.

“Sir. The bots here are as capable as anyone I have seen. They can repair cells and lift whole buildings with the megabots. Give them the benefit of the doubt that they can do what we could.” Fae frowned and pulled at her ear.

“The logs show my brother now weighs less than his clothes. There is only liquid helium in his veins now, as soon as he’s taken out, he’ll crumble like dried out leaf.”

“He still has a PICC line, like we all do.” Fae said. “We can infuse more into it in the chamber, correct?”

“No, I don’t know.” He shook his head. “Maybe. Could be. If we warmed him up to, say, four Kelvin? Special IV tubing would remain flexible and we could flow cryoprotectant into him and refill all the cells over the course of a few days and displace the helium. The helium would be at the boiling point and easy to replace.”

“What if we just replace his fluids as we warmed him up?” She asked.

“No, helium would be gone before any glucose or blood solutions would make it into his body, the cells would collapse like dried out eggshells the moment there is any pressure to refill them.” He rubbed his chin. “That’s not even medical, that is structural engineering. Right now, helium is supporting everything. It has to be a two-stage rehydration. Maybe three.”

“Okay. We warm him up first?”

“No. Oh no. We get the medical teams out first. Just because I understand the process, does not mean I understand the biological effects. What if he has a hole in something important? I can’t sew it up.”

“Oh, I understand.”

“So engineers first, medical folk second, so engineers can make things work, the ones marked here in red, they are last. Medical will need to deal with them as a team with the… What did you call them? Nanobots? But there will need to be a teamwork between everyone. Artificial or Organic.”

“Thank you.” Thea smiled as she sat up in her saddle.

“Thank me for what?”

“You acknowledged us as living beings and are part of a team. Even our nanos.”

“Miss… Uh. “

“Thea.”

“Miss Thea. You make it easy.”

“No. Just Thea.”

“Okay, Just Thea.” He smiled. “You make it easy to feel you are real and alive. We have been here to seek contact with new life. Even if we build it.”

Thea laughed.

“My full name is Wentvie Thea. Our second name is given, our family name comes first.”

“My apologies.” Amsi winked. Then Thea knew she was victim of a human sense of humor. “I will refer to you only as Thea or Miss Wentvie.”

She laughed. It sounded like tiny windchimes.

*Humans waking up,* she felt, *A good thing.*

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Gen 3. Chapter 2. Amsi Idd-Tejo

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Gen 3. Chapter 2. Amsi Idd-Tejo

Hours passed. Fae tapped on the keyboard, swearing because her fingers were not fully working right.

“You have to give yourself a chance, your bone marrow is barely producing red-blood cells.” Thea said as she used a small object that Fae assumed was a kind of scanner.

“How does that work?”

“Since the intravenous infusions, you have nanobots of medical programming in you. They answer to this syscheck request. They are repairing cellular damage as you are moving around.”

“I have… bots inside me? What?” Fae stopped and looked at the Minibot, for the first time, the colors seemed more natural. Thea was shaped like a human, even if her eyes were a golden color.

“Yes, they are medical Nanobots, in seven days they will inactivate and be passed out of your body, unless we administer more.” Thea said as if it was a normal thing.

“I don’t like that thought.” Fae shook her head. “Oh! Here. I found him, there is a problem in the reactivation sequence, it is locked in a diagnostic loop.”

“What’s that?”

“Helium is refreshed and re-sampled every few minutes. A temperature sensor is giving a corrupted data. The system is recycling and producing liquid helium… How is it getting power?”

“We have maintained all needs of the Core Systems.”

“Oh, right.” Fae blinked and sat back. “Do your nanobots do all the maintenance?”

“Most of it, Microbots do a lot, too. Nanobots perform repairs the Micros can’t reach. Micros do things for Nanos faster and on a larger scale.”

“Hm. Okay. Then they have kept the cryogen production intact. That saves a lot of issues.” Fae nodded as she tapped a command. “It is still locked. I will have to issue a kill command and restart it.”

“Kill? Don’t you want to keep him alive?” Thea’s voice sounded alarmed. For an artificial life form, a tiny robot, she exhibited emotions and personality.

“This just interrupts the program so it can start normally. Otherwise we have to go down there and do it physically.”

“I can instruct Micros to do it. Even a Macro if you need a lever pulled.”

“No levers, there is a single button down there that will need to be pushed and held down for… Wait. Wait! Got it.” Fae smiled. “It is corrected and the thaw procedures are in effect. How long did it take for me to come out of hibernation?”

“Thirty-one thousand…”

“No no, after the Core Systems took me out of the helium capsule.”

“Oh, it was ninety-six hours before you took your first breath and your core temp allowed for cellular respiration. We used a lot of synthetic oxygenated fluids, moist, warmed oxygen.” Thea said. “The nanobots worked at maximum capacity, there were signs of damage, but nothing critical caused by length of time, all the damage was due to by freezing. Your process was not perfect, and ice crystals poked a lot of holes in things.”

“Is that why I am so weak?” Fae stood up. “Let’s go back to the medical department.”

“No, weakness is from a lack of use, the fibers have gotten stiff and your processing of glucose and glycogen is altered. A lot of carbon is building up as lactic acid.” Thea said as she buzzed around Fae as the two moved down the hallway. “But your system has improved cellular by nearly double. You will be back to what we estimate as normal in thirty-six hours. We still have to watch your kidney function.”

“Why my kidneys?”

“Too much strain too soon.” Thea said. “We could fix it, but always better to prevent it. Lots easier to keep things going than to start them from total breakdown.”

“You say it like I am a machine.”

“You are. Just organic circuitry instead of printed in a machine.”

Fae laughed at the philosophical Minibot. Thea was like a know-it-all little sister. And it tickled in a good way to think of Thea like that and Fae liked that thought.

“Thea, what will they do with Mr. Idd-Tejo?”

“Well, first is to warm the patient so the cryogenic liquid becomes less viscous, then start an infusion of fluorocarbon…”

“Enough. I don’t need the details, just the basics. I am not a medical person.”

“Oh. Well, we warm him up slowly and then start the nanobots and blood infusion when he gets warm enough.”

“I want to watch it all.”

“Of course, I think the Doctor would let you watch. But you will need to sleep. You still need observervation for your kidneys and blood values. Your marrow is still shocked and recovering from being in deep freeze.” Thea advised the human woman.

“What is in there.” Fae stopped and looked down a hallway that was new looking. “I don’t remember that part of the building.”

“This is the place were the Core System directs sub systems to build all bots. Except for the Mega’s. Printers build their parts here, but then transported to another building for treatment to make them stronger. Building a Megabot is power consuming and has only a limited application. Macrobots are printed in parts and then assembled by bot arms on an assembly table.”

“And you are assembled the same way?”

“No, Minibots come right out of the printer. We get organic flesh, it is found that the larger Microbot up to Minibot can benefit from organic material, we have a tactile interface that the other bots cannot use properly.”

“I see, I think.” Fae pulled at her ear. “You are more of a Cyborg.”

“Cyborg?” Glitter the dragonfly pulled up when Thea turned her head. Then patted the metallic insect ride. “Sorry. I yanked on you.”

“Cybernetic organism.” Fae smiled, having information that the little Minibot did not have. A rare event with the know-it-all.

“I will have to consult the Core System when I am on my down time to recharge.”

“You recharge?”

“Not in the way you might think. It is a kind of sleep, it is not programmed, we consume hydrogenated carbons, then we have to sit still while the Nanos and Micros inside us turn it into energy. It’s a symbiotic relationship, but a narrow application.” Thea flitted past her larger friend. “The small bots can’t be used for anything else, they inactivate when they are outside our bodies. It is a mutation that the Core Systems don’t have an answer for.”

Fae shook her head. These bots may have a synthetic birth, life existed in the electronic hearts.

*What a strange world.* Fae smiled at the thought.

Steel Gardens of Anid-Sta. (Generation 1. Rescue)

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Generation 1. Rescue

Captain of the guard watched over his daughter. Like all fathers, he balanced that fine line between keeping her safe, and allowing her to have her adventures.

“No one learns without getting a bruise now and again.” His own father would tell him. Beekan Luc watched her as she rode the armored flyer.

She was little more than a young adult. If in human terms, they were extremely old. The last human went into the machine after the virus nearly wiped them out.

The humans remained in vats of liquid helium ever since, frozen in a deep slumber that none of the caretakers knew when it would end.

Trix had passed her three-thousandth birthday just a decade ago, for the Caretakers, that was her right of passage year.

Each year on Anid-Sta as it orbited in a highly elliptical orbit around the young red star every four-hundred fifty-six stellar cycles. Each day of eighteen standard hours, to the second.

Of the entire corps, Trix was the last one to join in the riders of the sky. She always ran off, looking for adventure in the badlands.

Her white-metal dragonfly, Evan, the product of evolving design from the mainframe printers.

Replicating printers, creating circuits in three-dimensions, articulated appendages and the most astounding of all the developments since the time humans began the long hibernation, metallic wings, so fine and thin, that light passed through the metallic wings.

The caregiver computer that built and programmed them all, printing them in organic and metal, the Caregivers of the Fae, the origins of their titles made Luc smile, but their job was to dismantle all weapons of the humans. To build a peaceful world while those that set it all in motion slept a sleep that the caregivers kept from becoming permenant.

But for the amount of weapons. The caretakers slowly recycled the metals to create a larger society of metal birds, insects and caretakers.

Bipedal in shape, the core program copied their shape after humans, evolved the programs and constructs as peace-loving  caregivers to the plants and the extant organic life, they grew in numbers, taking the stout engines of war and rebuilding them into usable tools.

Repairing systems that kept the depths of an artificial cave systems in operation. In cylinders, sealed with the contents hidden from view.

A refrigerant fluid was kept in order by the multi-legged keepers of the core.

One calm day, thirty-thousand solstice-cycles after the last human, recorded by the computer, died.

A chime sounded.

The chime, written into the code of the protectors, excited them all.

Evolution of the caretakers, now constructed to the size of a thumb, gathered around when the first of the cylinders, a label marked “MacLir, Fae” vented and opened down the middle, like a three-sectioned steel flower, exposing a tall bipedal body. The automated table smoothly rolled along a track to a glass enclosed room that filled with a mist, warmed to a digital read-out of forty-degrees-c.

Silver robotic arms moved around, placing heat-pads on the body, previously inserted intravenous lines connected to bags of opaque, heated, dark-red fluid infused through the lines into the nude body of the female human lay inert for hours as the heated, calorie- and electrolyte rich fluids coursed through the veins and arteries.

In the third hour, the cardiac muscle gave the first beat in three-hundred centuries. Frozen lungs began to move airs slowly at first, warmed oxygen laden with surfactants assisted the weak efforts of the diaphragm with positive pressure, until the patient was able to breathe on her own.

In the world of the caregivers, swimmers, flyers, crawlers, collectively calling themselves the Caretakers of Fae, hovered, stood, climbed on each other and stood on shoulders to see inside the glass-walled room.

Movement in the room, not of metal, but of flesh, a hand moved up to the brow of Fae MacLir, exploring her face and the tape that held her eyes shut.

A small grunt of pain, she pulled off the tape covering her eyes. The first of the humans were awake. The oldest of their species.

After the long walk of ages, the rescue of the human species was coming to pass.

And the Caretakers of Fae marked the event to the millisecond.